Keynote: John T. Lynch, Jr.

dojseal360John T. Lynch, Jr. is the Chief of the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS), Criminal Division, U.S. Department of Justice.

John entered the Department through the Attorney General’s Honors Program in 1995 and has served in the Criminal Division at CCIPS since 1997. John joined the Section as a Trial Attorney and served in numerous roles there before being named Chief in 2012. In addition to supervising approximately 40 attorneys and the CCIPS Cybercrime Laboratory, John regularly gives assistance and guidance to AUSAs and law enforcement agents in complex investigations involving computer crimes, intellectual property rights, and electronic evidence collection. He has also advised senior Department officials on cybercrime, intellectual property, and cyber security policy and legislation. He served as member of the team negotiating the first multilateral treaty on computer crime, for which the team received the Attorney General’s Distinguished Service Award in 2002. John also received the Attorney General’s John Marshall Award for Legal Advice in 2014, in recognition of his leadership of CCIPS. A native of Western New York, John received his B.A. from the University of Rochester and his law degree from Cornell Law School.

 

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Details

When: Wednesday, April 18, 2018
7:00 am - 8:15 am (breakfast & registration)
8:15 am - 5:00 pm (followed by cocktail party)
Where: Mayflower Hotel
1127 Connecticut Ave, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
CLE Credit: 6.0 hours (approved in VA and PA)

CLE Info and Forms

SEF2014 CLE -smCLE forms available here.

Materials

Links to materials available here.

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